[Sqg-program] 6 Articles - Household chemicals study, Cell Phones, Clean Marinas, Home Tips, Recycled Products, FEMA courses

Perrigan, Glen Glen.Perrigan@dep.state.fl.us
Fri, 12 Nov 2004 15:56:00 -0500


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Chemical Industry Funds Aid EPA Study (They will be studying 60 children =
in
Duval County, FL!)=20
Effect of Substances on Children Probed
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62569-2004Oct25.html?sub=3D=
new
<http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62569-2004Oct25.html?sub=3D=
new>
(registration needed to view on web site)
By Juliet Eilperin=20
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, October 26, 2004; Page A23=20
The Environmental Protection Agency has agreed to accept $2 million from =
the
American Chemistry Council to help fund a study exploring the impact of
pesticides and household chemicals on young children, prompting an =
outcry
from environmentalists.=20

The Children's Environmental Exposure Research Study -- known by its =
acronym
CHEERS -- does not mark the first time the agency has accepted chemical
industry money to conduct research; the Clinton administration signed =
similar
agreements. But it represents the most money the chemical trade group =
has
given the EPA. The chemical industry council represents about 135
manufacturers and spends $20 million a year on research.

Paul Gilman, who serves as science adviser and assistant administrator =
for
the EPA's office of research and development, said the money will help =
the
agency conduct "groundbreaking work" on how chemicals are absorbed by =
infants
and children as old as 3.=20

"We will seek their opinions, but we're in control of the project," =
Gilman
said. "We're comfortable with the fact that it's our study design."=20

Environmental Working Group President Kenneth A. Cook questioned why an
agency with a $572 million research budget needed to accept industry
contributions to conduct scientific research.=20

"It simply is not credible that a $7.8 billion agency that employs =
almost
18,000 people has to go to the chemical industry to get $2 million for a
crucial study to see if chemicals hurt kids," he said. "This is a =
government
function; we should be investing government funds to be absolutely sure =
it's
independent."=20

The study will survey 60 children over the next two years in Duval =
County,
Fla., and collect information on their exposure to pesticides and =
household
chemicals, such as flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals, a =
family of
substances in products such as Teflon and Scotchgard. Some of these =
chemicals
have come under scrutiny for possible links to health problems.=20

Carol Henry, vice president for science and research at the American
Chemistry Council, said her industry wanted to promote a better =
understanding
of the risks associated with chemical exposure. Teaming up with a =
preexisting
federal study gives her group financial leverage, she said.=20

"Exposure has been ignored for many, many years. It's the wasteland of =
risk
assessment," Henry said. "We'd like the regulatory framework to be based =
on a
very firm scientific foundation."=20

Henry said her association had set up a board of academics and industry
officials to be "a resource to investigators" on an occasional basis, =
but
added her group would not get advance notice of the results and the
government would retain control over its findings. "We'll give them our
guidance, but they don't have to take it," she said. The EPA's Gilman =
said it
was reasonable to accept industry money in light of the gravity of the
situation. Researchers still don't know how these compounds "are getting =
into
our blood," he said, adding that young children are rarely studied, =
making
the survey especially valuable.=20

In late September, Linda Sheldon, acting director for the EPA's human
exposure and atmospheric sciences division, said the agency has "very =
little
information about how children may be exposed to chemicals in household
products, whether it's through the air they breathe, food they eat or =
the
surfaces they touch."=20

Gilman said the chemical manufacturers imposed no conditions to their
contribution: "They said, 'Who do we make the check out to?' It's $2 =
million
in additional support with no strings attached."=20

But Cook said he remained concerned industry officials could still =
influence
a study that could lay the groundwork for future regulation. "To have
industry sponsoring the government to do it, to us, doesn't seem like a =
good
idea, to say the least," Cook said.=20

*******************************************************************=20
Clean Marinas and Boatyards Make a Cleaner Future=20
TALLAHASSEE - Florida's Clean Marinas and Boatyards are preventing =
pollution
and protecting the state's sensitive waterways. In its first five years,
Florida officially certified 79 Clean Marinas and 12 Clean Boatyards =
within
25 counties. Together, the environmentally-friendly facilities have =
recycled
more than 600,000 pounds of glass, 1.5 million pounds of paper, 3.7 =
million
pounds of aluminum, 5.6 million gallons of oil and a million gallons of
antifreeze.=20

"With thousands of boaters using Florida waters every day, this
public-private partnership benefits both the marine industry and the
environment," said Division of Law Enforcement Assistant Director Maury
Kolchakian. "The Clean Marina Program has prevented pollution from =
entering
Florida's waters. Expanding the program helps spread the environmental
message."=20

Recently, the Clean Marina Program expanded its scope to include marine
retailers, which sell and service new and used recreational vessels.
Extending the program to retailers provides an opportunity to inform
thousands of boaters about clean boating habits at the point of sales =
and
services. Clean Marinas, Boatyards, and now Marine Retailers, go above =
and
beyond required environmental regulations by adopting safeguards that =
keep
solvents, sewage, fuel and oil out of the water, while protecting =
manatees
and other marine creatures.=20

Over 2,000 marinas currently provide services to thousands of boaters =
using
state waters daily. The effects of year-round boating activities =
contribute
to the constant and growing pressure on Florida's sensitive aquatic and
marine ecosystems. In response, the Clean Boating Partnership, which =
includes
the Department, Marine Industries Association of Florida, Florida Sea =
Grant
Program, United States Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary, developed =
the
Clean Marina Program to help marinas, boatyards and boaters protect =
water
quality using simple environmental practices that prevent pollution.=20

"Clean water is the lifeblood of tourism, Florida's largest industry," =
said
Susan Kingston, Chair of the Clean Boating Partnership. "By educating =
boaters
and improving operations at marine facilities, Florida's Clean Marinas =
and
Boatyards are ensuring a sustainable future for the environment, for =
boaters
and for the billion-dollar marine industry."=20

The Clean Boating Partnership recently elected this year's officers, all =
from
designated Clean Marinas or Clean Boatyards. Susan Kingston, National =
Safety
and Environmental Compliance Director for MarineMax, was elected =
Chairman for
a second year. Don Borum, General Manager for Hidden Harbor Marina, and =
Chris
Lamb, Chief Financial Officer for Lamb's Yacht Center, were elected as
Vice-Chairmen.=20

For more information, visit =
http://www.floridacleanboatingpartnership.com.=20
*************************************************************=20
Report Considers Mobile Phones Hazardous Waste=20
The Basel Action Network (BAN), Seattle, has released two independent =
studies
revealing that discarded mobile phones that no longer contain batteries =
still
qualify as hazardous waste. The studies, funded by the U.S. =
Environmental
Protection Agency and the State of California, indicate that metal lead =
in
the phones potentially can leach into landfills. Members of the Basel
Convention's Mobile Phone Partnership Initiative, however, have refused =
to
address the toxicity of mobile phones, reportedly saying the issue is =
outside
of the committee's mandate. For details or to see the report, visit
www.ban.org <file:///\\www.ban.org>
(http://www.ban.org/Library/mobilephonetoxicityrep.pdf
<http://www.ban.org/Library/mobilephonetoxicityrep.pdf> ).

**********************************************************************=20
HOME IMPROVED
by Max Alexander
The Reader's Digest Association, Inc=20
Get this: Your home is already an ecological wonder. Over the last 25 =
years
the amount of energy used by the typical refrigerator dropped by =
two-thirds;
washing-machine energy needs have been reduced by nearly half; the use =
of
redwood decking has fallen by two-thirds; and toilets use less than half =
the
water that they did in the 1970s.

You had no idea how good you were being, did you? Making choices that =
help
the environment doesn't mean sacrificing comfort and, in fact, many
green-home products are downright luxurious. Unfortunately, this =
contributes
to the perception that the products are budget busters -- a myth, says =
Alex
Wilson, executive editor of Environmental Building News. "Certainly =
there are
high-end green homes that demonstrate what's feasible, but the average
homeowner can use many green strategies -- and some actually reduce the =
cost
of a home."

Architect Angela Dean, author of the book Green by Design, says even =
small
changes can have a big impact. "Every time you change a light bulb, =
replace
it with a compact fluorescent," she says. According to government =
experts, if
every home in America replaced just one light bulb with a compact
fluorescent, the reduction in pollution would be equal to removing one
million cars from the road.

Here, you'll find our picks for the best and the brightest ideas in =
green
building. Many of the products you can add to your house right away; =
others
you can save for, and incorporate the next time you need a new roof or =
deck.
Either way, being good has never been easier.

Bamboo Flooring
Wood floors are gorgeous, but hardwoods traditionally used in flooring =
take
decades to grow, and can be harvested irresponsibly in rain forests. The
solution is bamboo flooring. Although bamboo is technically a grass, it =
grows
like a tree -- only faster. Since it matures in three years and =
regenerates
itself, bamboo doesn't contribute to global deforestation. (Most =
material
used in flooring comes from controlled bamboo forests in China.) When
laminated into boards, bamboo is as tough as oak or maple, and has a =
richly
patterned grain enlivened by tiny "nodes" -- the bamboo equivalent of
knotholes. It installs much like hardwood flooring and costs about the =
same.
Be sure to finish it with a water-based urethane, which is less toxic =
than
solvent-based finishes. For more information, you can visit plyboo.com =
or
teragren.com.

Solar Roofing
One drawback to solar-generated electricity is the unwieldy panels, =
which
look out of place on a traditional home. Now you can harness the sun's =
power
right through roof shingles, thanks to a technology called thin-film
triple-junction amorphous silicon. These space-age solar cells are =
shaped
like conventional shingles and can be installed just like regular =
shingles,
then wired into your home's electric system. Wilson says they're not as
efficient as freestanding solar panels, but depending on weather =
conditions,
they can generate virtually all the power for your home. In August, when =
the
shingles are cranking out more electricity than you need, the current =
gets
fed into the power grid, running your meter backward and thereby =
reducing
your electric bill -- which makes up for rainy days, when output is =
reduced.
Solar shingles cost $40 to $50 a square foot installed, versus about $8 =
for
regular shingles, but you may only need them on the south side of the =
house.
And many states are now offering generous subsidies. To learn more, =
visit
www.eere.energy.gov <file:///\\www.eere.energy.gov>  or =
smartroofsolar.com.

On-Demand Water Heaters
Most houses have a hot-water tank that is constantly fired up, keeping =
40 to
80 gallons ready for the next shower or laundry load. By contrast, =
on-demand
water heaters don't use a tank. Instead they employ a powerful burner to =
heat
water only when needed. The result is up to 34 percent greater =
efficiency,
according to a report by the National Association of Home Builders =
Research
Center. (The heaters cost from $200 to $500 more than a traditional =
system.)
On-demand heaters also save space because they are small and =
wall-mounted
(about the size of a household electrical circuit box). And they cut =
down on
landfill waste, which is where old water tanks end up. Wilson recommends
gas-fired models with an electronic ignition device; avoid pilot lights,
which waste gas. "It's important to get the right size heater for your =
home
and lifestyle," he says. This is a job for a heating professional, or =
your
gas company. Visit nahbrc.com or controlledenergy.com for more =
information.

Decking
Traditional decking may use pressure-treated pine, which until this year =
was
usually laced with toxic substances like arsenic. And the stain or paint
applied to the wood often contains dangerous solvents. For a change, =
consider
one of the many composite deck products made from recycled plastic (like =
milk
jugs) and wood fiber. Besides looking great, they won't rot, crack or
splinter. They resist termites, never need staining, and contain no =
toxic
additives. Composite decking like Weyerhaeuser's ChoiceDek can cost two =
or
three times as much as pressure-treated decking, and 15 percent more =
than
cedar or redwood. But when you factor in the cost of maintaining a wood =
deck,
the difference narrows over time. "Here is a great example of a product =
where
the life cycle cost justifies the initial cost," says Wilson. For more, =
visit
ecoproducts.com or trex.com.

Occupancy Switches
Scientists haven't figured out how to get kids to turn off lights in =
their
rooms. But they've made great strides in occupancy switches, which sense =
when
no one is in a room and then shut off automatically. Older models that
monitored ambient sound levels were not reliable; the latest switches =
rely on
infrared technology, ultrasonic signals, or both. Infrared switches are =
most
common in homes; they need a direct line of sight and work best in =
simple
four-walled spaces. Some, like Leviton's Decora Occupancy Sensor ($70), =
are
designed to replace a standard wall switch. Others are ceiling-mounted. =
Visit
sensorswitch.com or smarthome.com for more information.

Salvaged Wood
Salvaged wood comes from two places -- buildings that are being torn =
down or,
increasingly, underwater. Logging operations in the 19th century used
waterways to float trees to sawmills; many logs sank. Today, divers are
recovering these logs, which remain preserved in the cold fresh water. =
This
salvaged wood often sells at a premium -- $6 to $8 per board foot, and
considerably more for exotic varieties like bird's-eye maple. The logs =
are
from virgin forests, where a thick canopy slowed growth and resulted in
exceptionally tight grains favored by fine woodworkers. "You can't buy =
that
kind of wood new anymore," says Wilson. Often the wood is from trees =
that are
now largely wiped out, like longleaf yellow pine. The wood can be used =
in any
part of construction, from ceiling beams to flooring, or in furniture. =
Lumber
recovered from old buildings is notable for its character, which may =
include
nail holes or other markings. Visit timelesstimber.com or =
thewoodenduck.com
to learn more.

Compact Fluorescents
These light bulbs, which use about 75 percent less energy than =
incandescent
bulbs, have been around since the early 1980s. But in the past few years
they've gotten better, smaller -- and cheaper. How cheap? Try five =
bucks,
with a five-year guarantee. The reason, says Wilson, is simple: =
competition.
"When California had its power crisis there was a huge upsurge in =
compact
fluorescent, and Chinese companies began making them inexpensively. Now
they're being made by dozens of companies, plus some utilities offer
rebates." Today's compact fluorescents have electronic ballasts that =
switch
on quickly and don't buzz. And the colors are much warmer than the =
ghostly
white models of the past. (Wilson recommends compacts with a color
temperature of 3,000 degrees Kelvin.) Visit www.energystar.gov
<file:///\\www.energystar.gov>  or wattstopper.com to learn more.

*****************************************=20
Talkin' Trash
By Nancy Kalish
The Reader Digest Association, Inc.=20
After you toss a plastic soda bottle into a recycling bin, you probably =
don't
think much about what happens to it -- or the dozens of other items you =
throw
away each day. But believe it or not, your trash has a fascinating =
afterlife.
Though troublesome trends continue to develop, we do manage to recycle =
about
a third of our garbage, sometimes quite creatively. One reason: "Trash =
is big
business," says Darryl Young, director of the California Department of
Conservation. Americans earn nearly $1 billion annually by recycling =
aluminum
cans. "And lots of companies are working hard to design functional, =
often
beautiful, objects out of what we've tossed."

Take a closer look at some of the reincarnations around you. In Wharton =
State
Park in New Jersey, you'll find the first vehicular bridge built largely =
from
a strong-as-steel polymer made of recycled plastics, including those =
soda
bottles. Constructed in 2002, the bridge looks like it's made of painted
wood. Lumber created from recycled plastics is also being used in
playgrounds, decks and outdoor furniture, such as all-weather Adirondack
chairs carried by L.L.Bean.

And that T-shirt you're wearing? It could also be made from recycled =
soda
bottles (it takes about 14 20-ounce bottles to make an extra large). The
plastic is chopped into small flakes, cleaned of contaminants, melted =
and
extruded into fibers, which are then spun to create yarn or other =
materials.

Recycled plastic may also make up the fiberfill in your sleeping bag, =
using
85 bottles that might have lasted 700 years as landfill before =
degrading.

Auto manufacturers have also gotten on the bandwagon. As a partner in =
the
EPA's WasteWise program, the Ford Motor Company uses recycled plastic =
soda
bottles (60 million of them in 1999) to make window frames, trunk =
carpets and
other car parts. And when its life is over, every Ford is at least 75 =
percent
recyclable. General Motors has also increased the amount of recycled
materials it uses in new cars.

On the terrorism front, disposable razors and food storage containers =
are
recycled as security barriers made of Plas-Crete, a 50/50 mix of ground =
rigid
plastic and concrete. "Plas-Crete is lighter than concrete, but just as
sturdy," says Paul Careau of Conigliaro Industries, the Framingham,
Massachusetts, maker of the material, which protects National Guard base
stations around the country. "And when shot at by rifles, the barriers =
were
better at absorbing bullets without shattering."

Of course, plastic isn't the only type of rubbish to be reborn. Despite
e-mail and other electronic documents, paper still comprises more than a
third of all trash. But almost half of all paper is recycled, reused as
everything from cereal cartons to soundproofing. Recycled tires spend =
their
retirement supporting national sports-literally. The stadiums and =
practice
fields of 17 NFL teams feature FieldTurf, an artificial surface that's
created from spent tires -- 40,000 per field. It's low maintenance and =
easier
on players' bodies.

Even New York City subway cars are finding life after decommissioning -- =
as
artificial reefs. More than 1,000 have been cleaned up and dropped into
waters off the coasts of New Jersey, Delaware, South Carolina, Georgia =
and
Virginia, where they serve as home (and importantly, nurseries) for up =
to 200
species of sea life.

While it's true the amount of household garbage in the United States has
increased from 2.7 pounds per person per day in 1960 to 4.4 pounds in =
2001,
recycling efforts are paying off. In 2001 we recycled 68 million tons =
(double
the amount in 1990) of potential pollutants. And recycling conserves =
energy
-- one aluminum can saves enough energy to run a TV for three hours.

At the same time, manufacturing is priming the pump that makes garbage a
resource. "Companies across all industries, from cars to carpets, have =
spent
hundreds of millions of dollars retrofitting their plants to use =
recycled
materials," says Terry Grist, a policy analyst for the EPA. Trash is =
cheap
raw material.

On the downside, perhaps our biggest current problem is a recent =
phenomenon:
e-waste. Our rapidly upgrading technology is creating a lot of old, =
orphaned
electronics. According to Inform, Inc., an environmental research group,
about 100 million cell phones were trashed in 2003 and less than 1 =
percent
have been recovered for reuse since 1999. The EPA predicts that 250 =
million
computers will become obsolete by 2005.

"The issue isn't just landfill space," says Eric Goldsmith of the =
Goldsmith
Group, an electronics recycling firm. "Circuit boards contain toxic =
heavy
metals, such as lead and cadmium, that are extremely hazardous to the
environment. Fortunately, many manufacturers are designing more easily
recycled products -- or are making them with fewer hard-to-recover =
materials
in the first place -- before the federal government passes legislation =
to
force them to do it."

For example, Panasonic is designing TVs and other products with fewer =
heavy
metals. Hewlett-Packard has created a prototype for an ink-jet printer =
with a
shell made from a compostable, corn-based "bioplastic."

And many computer companies are launching recycling programs, some of =
which
will arrange to pick up your equipment. "The trouble is, most people =
aren't
aware of these programs," says Goldsmith. Manufacturer's websites, =
however,
list policies.

Sometimes we unwittingly sabotage our own recycling efforts. "While it's =
true
that the contents of plastic, glass and metal bins often get dumped =
together
and sorted again at the processing plant, it's key that all materials =
are of
recyclable quality," says Jennifer Gitlitz, research director of the
Container Recycling Institute. "If you're overzealous and throw in a =
light
bulb or broken coffee mug or china plate -- none of which can be =
recycled --
you may be contaminating the whole batch." Check with your local public =
works
department for what is -- and isn't -- allowed.

Apparently, Americans want to do the right thing. According to a 2003 =
survey,
91 percent of us are concerned about protecting the environment. And =
recently
the United Nations Environment Programme convened a panel of =
psychologists
and human behaviorists to find non-guilt-provoking approaches to market
recycling.

"With so much other stuff to worry about, like terrorism, scary =
statistics
aren't making the same impact they used to," says Jacquelyn Ottman, a =
New
York City-based green marketing consultant. A new ad created for the =
state of
California features a plastic bottle thrilled to be reborn as a =
lifesaving
buoy carried by a beautiful lifeguard; another has a glass
bottle-turned-disco ball that gets to party all night long. "We want to =
show
people there's hope and empower them to make a difference as individuals =
--
because they can."

It Is Easy Being Green
In addition to regular recycling, here are ways to make sure your waste
isn't, well, a total waste.

l. Recycle old computer equipment (visit the manufacturer's website) or
donate it through an organization such as the National Cristina =
Foundation
(cristina.org), which matches equipment with schools and charities.

2. Donate old cell phones to victims of domestic violence through the
Wireless Foundation's Call to Protect Campaign (wirelessfoundation.org).

3. Drop off used cell phones, PDAs, pagers and other handheld devices at =
your
local Staples, which will donate them to charity or recycle.

4. Recycle all rechargeable batteries from your electronics. You can =
call
800-8-BATTERY or visit rbrc.org to find one of 30,000 collection =
centers,
including many Home Depot, Staples and Sears stores.

5. Nike's Reuse-A-Shoe program recycles old sneakers into Nike Grind, a
surface for basketball and tennis courts, soccer fields, tracks and
playgrounds. For drop-off locations, go to Nikebiz.com and click on
"responsibility" and then "environment."

6. Check out the furniture, toys, clothing and other products made from
recycled materials in the Green Gift Guide (greengiftguide.com), =
sponsored by
the California Department of Conservation.

7. Don't forget the Salvation Army and similar charities. This =
organization
represents one of the best -- and most generous ways -- to recycle.=20

*****************************************=20
FEMA'S NEW ON-LINE COURSES=20

UNDERSTANDING THE NEW NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (NIMS)=20

The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management =
Agency
(FEMA) has a new online course that will help first responders =
understand the
concepts and principles underlying the new National Incident Management
System (NIMS) and to begin incorporating NIMS into their own planning =
and
policies. To streamline coordination at the federal, state and local =
levels,
President Bush directed the creation of NIMS, a newly developed, =
standardized
incident management approach to emergency incidents.=20

 =20
"NIMS establishes standard incident management processes, protocols and
procedures so that all responders - including those at the federal, =
state,
tribal and local level - can coordinate their responses, share a common =
focus
and place full emphasis on resolving the event," said Homeland Security
Secretary Tom Ridge. "This new course introduces NIMS in a way that is =
easy
and accessible to the nation's emergency responders."

 =20
The training experts at Homeland Security's Emergency Management =
Institute
created the online course, which takes about three hours to complete. =
The
course can be found at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWEB/IS/is700.asp
<http://training.fema.gov/EMIWEB/IS/is700.asp> .=20

 =20
The recently announced NIMS Integration Center, called the NIC, is being
established to provide strategic direction and oversight of NIMS. The =
NIC was
established by Secretary Ridge with FEMA as the lead to assure the
all-hazards approach is an integral part of response training. The NIC =
will
develop and facilitate national standards for NIMS education and =
training and
refine the system over time.

 =20
"Emergency management is a departmental priority, and enhancing the
capabilities of first responders and emergency managers is key in =
responding
to all hazards," said Michael D. Brown, Under Secretary of Homeland =
Security
for Emergency Preparedness and Response. "This new online course is one =
of
many ways Secretary Ridge and I are working with our partners to put =
NIMS
into practice for the American people."

 =20
NIMS builds on the long-used and successful Incident Command System and =
the
proven principles of unified command. Another key feature of NIMS =
includes
communication and information management so that responders and managers
across all agencies, professions and jurisdictions have a common =
operating
picture for a more efficient and effective response.

=20

ENVIRONMENTAL AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION ISSUES DURING DISASTER =
OPERATIONS=20

The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management =
Agency
(FEMA) is unveiling an on-line, independent study course that will help
local, state, tribal and federal officials to navigate environmental and
historic preservation compliance regulations that affect FEMA's disaster
recovery programs.=20

"This course is one of the largest and most complex that we've ever put =
on
our online Virtual Campus to date. It took some two years to convert =
from our
paper-based curriculum," said Michael D. Brown, Under Secretary of =
Homeland
Security for Emergency Preparedness and Response. "It shows how serious =
we
are about expanding training opportunities throughout the nation and far
beyond our 'bricks and mortar' training facility in Maryland."

Specialists at FEMA developed the online course, IS 253: Coordinating
Environmental and Historical Preservation Compliance. The online course =
not
only presents how compliance issues should be addressed but also =
emphasizes
that environmental/historical preservation issues should be considered =
early
in the recovery process in order for projects to be funded as quickly as
possible.http://training.fema.gov/EMIWEB/IS/is253.asp

The course takes a minimum of 10 hours to complete, and those who
successfully complete it will receive a certificate. The course can be
accessed at http://training.fema.gov/emiweb =
<http://training.fema.gov/emiweb>
. From there, interested students should click on NETC Virtual Campus to
enroll.

On March 1, 2003, FEMA became part of the U.S. Department of Homeland
Security. FEMA's continuing mission within the new department is to lead =
the
effort to prepare the nation for all hazards and effectively manage =
federal
response and recovery efforts following any national incident. FEMA also
initiates proactive mitigation activities, trains first responders, and
manages Citizen Corps, the National Flood Insurance Program and the U.S. =
Fire
Administration.








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<p><b><font size=3D6 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:24.0pt;font-family:Arial;
font-weight:bold'><!-- Converted from text/rtf format -->Chemical =
Industry
Funds Aid EPA Study</span></font> </b><b><font size=3D2 =
face=3DArial><span
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;font-weight:bold'>(They will =
be
studying 60 children in</span></font> </b><b><font size=3D2><span
  style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-weight:bold'>Duval =
County</span></font></b><b><font
 size=3D2><span style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-weight:bold'>, =
</span></font></b><b><font
  size=3D2><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-weight:bold'>FL</span></font></b><b><font
size=3D2><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-weight:bold'>!)</span></font></b> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Effect
of Substances on Children Probed<br>
</span></font><a
href=3D"http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62569-2004Oct25.ht=
ml?sub=3Dnew"><b><font
size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;font-weight:
bold'>http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62569-2004Oct25.html=
?sub=3Dnew</span></font></b></a><b><span
style=3D'font-weight:bold'> </span></b><b><font size=3D2 =
face=3DArial><span
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;font-weight:bold'>(registrati=
on
needed to view on web site)<br>
</span></font></b><i><font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Arial;font-style:italic'>By Juliet =
Eilperin</span></font></i> <br>
  <font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Washington</span></font><fon=
t
size=3D2><span style=3D'font-size:10.0pt'> Post Staff Writer<br>
</span></font><font size=3D2><span style=3D'font-size:10.0pt'>Tuesday, =
October 26,
 2004</span></font><font size=3D2><span style=3D'font-size:10.0pt'>; =
Page A23</span></font>
<br>
The Environmental Protection Agency has agreed to accept $2 million from =
the
American Chemistry Council to help fund a study exploring the impact of
pesticides and household chemicals on young children, prompting an =
outcry from
environmentalists. </p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>The
Children's Environmental Exposure Research Study -- known by its acronym =
CHEERS
-- does not mark the first time the agency has accepted chemical =
industry money
to conduct research; the Clinton administration signed similar =
agreements. But
it represents the most money the chemical trade group has given the EPA. =
The
chemical industry council represents about 135 manufacturers and spends =
$20
million a year on research.</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>Paul
Gilman, who serves as science adviser and assistant administrator for =
the EPA's
office of research and development, said the money will help the agency =
conduct
&quot;groundbreaking work&quot; on how chemicals are absorbed by infants =
and
children as old as 3. </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>&quot;We
will seek their opinions, but we're in control of the project,&quot; =
Gilman
said. &quot;We're comfortable with the fact that it's our study =
design.&quot; </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>Environmental
Working Group President Kenneth A. Cook questioned why an agency with a =
$572
million research budget needed to accept industry contributions to =
conduct scientific
research. </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>&quot;It
simply is not credible that a $7.8 billion agency that employs almost =
18,000
people has to go to the chemical industry to get $2 million for a =
crucial study
to see if chemicals hurt kids,&quot; he said. &quot;This is a government
function; we should be investing government funds to be absolutely sure =
it's
independent.&quot; </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>The study
will survey 60 children over the next two years in </span></font>Duval =
County, Fla.,
and collect information on their exposure to pesticides and household
chemicals, such as flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals, a =
family of
substances in products such as Teflon and Scotchgard. Some of these =
chemicals
have come under scrutiny for possible links to health problems. </p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>Carol
Henry, vice president for science and research at the American Chemistry
Council, said her industry wanted to promote a better understanding of =
the
risks associated with chemical exposure. Teaming up with a preexisting =
federal
study gives her group financial leverage, she said. </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>&quot;Exposure
has been ignored for many, many years. It's the wasteland of risk
assessment,&quot; Henry said. &quot;We'd like the regulatory framework =
to be
based on a very firm scientific foundation.&quot; </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>Henry
said her association had set up a board of academics and industry =
officials to
be &quot;a resource to investigators&quot; on an occasional basis, but =
added
her group would not get advance notice of the results and the government =
would
retain control over its findings. &quot;We'll give them our guidance, =
but they
don't have to take it,&quot; she said. The EPA's Gilman said it was =
reasonable
to accept industry money in light of the gravity of the situation. =
Researchers
still don't know how these compounds &quot;are getting into our =
blood,&quot; he
said, adding that young children are rarely studied, making the survey
especially valuable. </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>In late
September, Linda Sheldon, acting director for the EPA's human exposure =
and
atmospheric sciences division, said the agency has &quot;very little
information about how children may be exposed to chemicals in household
products, whether it's through the air they breathe, food they eat or =
the
surfaces they touch.&quot; </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>Gilman
said the chemical manufacturers imposed no conditions to their =
contribution:
&quot;They said, 'Who do we make the check out to?' It's $2 million in
additional support with no strings attached.&quot; </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>But Cook
said he remained concerned industry officials could still influence a =
study
that could lay the groundwork for future regulation. &quot;To have =
industry
sponsoring the government to do it, to us, doesn't seem like a good =
idea, to
say the least,&quot; Cook said. </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>**********************************************=
*********************
<br>
</span></font><font size=3D6><span style=3D'font-size:24.0pt'>Clean =
Marinas and
Boatyards Make a Cleaner Future<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'> =
</span></b></span></font><br>
TALLAHASSEE &#8211; Florida&#8217;s Clean Marinas and Boatyards are =
preventing
pollution and protecting the state&#8217;s sensitive waterways. In its =
first
five years, Florida officially certified 79 Clean Marinas and 12 Clean
Boatyards within 25 counties. Together, the environmentally-friendly =
facilities
have recycled more than 600,000 pounds of glass, 1.5 million pounds of =
paper,
3.7 million pounds of aluminum, 5.6 million gallons of oil and a million
gallons of antifreeze. </p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>&#8220;With
thousands of boaters using </span></font>Florida waters every day, this
public-private partnership benefits both the marine industry and the
environment,&#8221; said Division of Law Enforcement Assistant Director =
Maury
Kolchakian. &#8220;The Clean Marina Program has prevented pollution from
entering Florida&#8217;s waters. Expanding the program helps spread the
environmental message.&#8221; </p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>Recently,
the Clean Marina Program expanded its scope to include marine retailers, =
which
sell and service new and used recreational vessels. Extending the =
program to
retailers provides an opportunity to inform thousands of boaters about =
clean
boating habits at the point of sales and services. Clean Marinas, =
Boatyards,
and now Marine Retailers, go above and beyond required environmental
regulations by adopting safeguards that keep solvents, sewage, fuel and =
oil out
of the water, while protecting manatees and other marine creatures. =
</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>Over
2,000 marinas currently provide services to thousands of boaters using =
state
waters daily. The effects of year-round boating activities contribute to =
the
constant and growing pressure on </span></font>Florida&#8217;s sensitive
aquatic and marine ecosystems. In response, the Clean Boating =
Partnership, which
includes the Department, Marine Industries Association of Florida, =
Florida Sea
Grant Program, United States Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary, =
developed
the Clean Marina Program to help marinas, boatyards and boaters protect =
water
quality using simple environmental practices that prevent pollution. =
</p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>&#8220;Clean
water is the lifeblood of tourism, </span></font>Florida&#8217;s largest
industry,&#8221; said Susan Kingston, Chair of the Clean Boating =
Partnership.
&#8220;By educating boaters and improving operations at marine =
facilities, Florida&#8217;s
Clean Marinas and Boatyards are ensuring a sustainable future for the
environment, for boaters and for the billion-dollar marine =
industry.&#8221; </p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>The Clean
Boating Partnership recently elected this year&#8217;s officers, all =
from
designated Clean Marinas or Clean Boatyards. Susan Kingston, National =
Safety
and Environmental Compliance Director for MarineMax, was elected =
Chairman for a
second year. Don Borum, General Manager for Hidden Harbor Marina, and =
Chris
Lamb, Chief Financial Officer for Lamb&#8217;s </span></font>Yacht =
Center, were
elected as Vice-Chairmen. </p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>For more
information, visit <a =
href=3D"http://www.floridacleanboatingpartnership.com">http://www.florida=
cleanboatingpartnership.com</a>.
<br>
************************************************************* <br>
</span></font><b><font size=3D6 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:24.0pt;
font-family:"Courier New";font-weight:bold'>Report Considers Mobile =
Phones
Hazardous Waste</span></font></b> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>The
Basel Action Network (BAN), </span></font><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier =
New"><span
  style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>Seattle</span></font><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>,
has released two independent studies revealing that discarded mobile =
phones
that no longer contain batteries still qualify as hazardous waste. The =
studies,
funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the State of =
</span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>California</span></font><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>,
indicate that metal lead in the phones potentially can leach into =
landfills.
Members of the Basel Convention's Mobile Phone Partnership Initiative, =
however,
have refused to address the toxicity of mobile phones, reportedly saying =
the
issue is outside of the committee's mandate. For details or to see the =
report,
visit </span></font><a href=3D"file:///\\www.ban.org"><font size=3D2
face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>www.ban.org</span></font></a><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>
(</span></font><a =
href=3D"http://www.ban.org/Library/mobilephonetoxicityrep.pdf"><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>http://www.ban.org/Library/mobilephonetoxicityrep.pdf</span></font>=
</a><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>).</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier =
New"'>*******************************************************************=
***</span></font>
<br>
<b><font size=3D6><span style=3D'font-size:24.0pt;font-weight:bold'>HOME =
IMPROVED</span></font></b><br>
by Max Alexander<br>
The Reader's Digest Association, Inc <br>
Get this: Your home is already an ecological wonder. Over the last 25 =
years the
amount of energy used by the typical refrigerator dropped by two-thirds;
washing-machine energy needs have been reduced by nearly half; the use =
of
redwood decking has fallen by two-thirds; and toilets use less than half =
the
water that they did in the 1970s.<br>
<br>
You had no idea how good you were being, did you? Making choices that =
help the
environment doesn't mean sacrificing comfort and, in fact, many =
green-home
products are downright luxurious. Unfortunately, this contributes to the =
perception
that the products are budget busters -- a myth, says Alex Wilson, =
executive
editor of Environmental Building News. &quot;Certainly there are =
high-end green
homes that demonstrate what's feasible, but the average homeowner can =
use many
green strategies -- and some actually reduce the cost of a =
home.&quot;<br>
<br>
Architect Angela Dean, author of the book<i><span =
style=3D'font-style:italic'>
Green by Design</span></i>, says even small changes can have a big =
impact.
&quot;Every time you change a light bulb, replace it with a compact
fluorescent,&quot; she says. According to government experts, if every =
home in
America replaced just one light bulb with a compact fluorescent, the =
reduction
in pollution would be equal to removing one million cars from the =
road.<br>
<br>
Here, you'll find our picks for the best and the brightest ideas in =
green
building. Many of the products you can add to your house right away; =
others you
can save for, and incorporate the next time you need a new roof or deck. =
Either
way, being good has never been easier.<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Bamboo Flooring</span></b><br>
Wood floors are gorgeous, but hardwoods traditionally used in flooring =
take
decades to grow, and can be harvested irresponsibly in rain forests. The
solution is bamboo flooring. Although bamboo is technically a grass, it =
grows
like a tree -- only faster. Since it matures in three years and =
regenerates
itself, bamboo doesn't contribute to global deforestation. (Most =
material used
in flooring comes from controlled bamboo forests in China.) When =
laminated into
boards, bamboo is as tough as oak or maple, and has a richly patterned =
grain
enlivened by tiny &quot;nodes&quot; -- the bamboo equivalent of =
knotholes. It
installs much like hardwood flooring and costs about the same. Be sure =
to
finish it with a water-based urethane, which is less toxic than =
solvent-based
finishes. For more information, you can visit plyboo.com or =
teragren.com.<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Solar Roofing</span></b><br>
One drawback to solar-generated electricity is the unwieldy panels, =
which look
out of place on a traditional home. Now you can harness the sun's power =
right
through roof shingles, thanks to a technology called thin-film =
triple-junction
amorphous silicon. These space-age solar cells are shaped like =
conventional
shingles and can be installed just like regular shingles, then wired =
into your
home's electric system. Wilson says they're not as efficient as =
freestanding solar
panels, but depending on weather conditions, they can generate virtually =
all
the power for your home. In August, when the shingles are cranking out =
more
electricity than you need, the current gets fed into the power grid, =
running
your meter backward and thereby reducing your electric bill -- which =
makes up
for rainy days, when output is reduced. Solar shingles cost $40 to $50 a =
square
foot installed, versus about $8 for regular shingles, but you may only =
need
them on the south side of the house. And many states are now offering =
generous
subsidies. To learn more, visit <a =
href=3D"file:///\\www.eere.energy.gov">www.eere.energy.gov</a>
or smartroofsolar.com.<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>On-Demand Water =
Heaters</span></b><br>
Most houses have a hot-water tank that is constantly fired up, keeping =
40 to 80
gallons ready for the next shower or laundry load. By contrast, =
on-demand water
heaters don't use a tank. Instead they employ a powerful burner to heat =
water
only when needed. The result is up to 34 percent greater efficiency, =
according
to a report by the National Association of Home Builders Research =
Center. (The
heaters cost from $200 to $500 more than a traditional system.) =
On-demand
heaters also save space because they are small and wall-mounted (about =
the size
of a household electrical circuit box). And they cut down on landfill =
waste,
which is where old water tanks end up. Wilson recommends gas-fired =
models with
an electronic ignition device; avoid pilot lights, which waste gas. =
&quot;It's
important to get the right size heater for your home and =
lifestyle,&quot; he
says. This is a job for a heating professional, or your gas company. =
Visit
nahbrc.com or controlledenergy.com for more information.<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Decking</span></b><br>
Traditional decking may use pressure-treated pine, which until this year =
was
usually laced with toxic substances like arsenic. And the stain or paint
applied to the wood often contains dangerous solvents. For a change, =
consider
one of the many composite deck products made from recycled plastic (like =
milk
jugs) and wood fiber. Besides looking great, they won't rot, crack or =
splinter.
They resist termites, never need staining, and contain no toxic =
additives.
Composite decking like Weyerhaeuser's ChoiceDek can cost two or three =
times as
much as pressure-treated decking, and 15 percent more than cedar or =
redwood. But
when you factor in the cost of maintaining a wood deck, the difference =
narrows
over time. &quot;Here is a great example of a product where the life =
cycle cost
justifies the initial cost,&quot; says Wilson. For more, visit =
ecoproducts.com
or trex.com.<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Occupancy Switches</span></b><br>
Scientists haven't figured out how to get kids to turn off lights in =
their
rooms. But they've made great strides in occupancy switches, which sense =
when
no one is in a room and then shut off automatically. Older models that
monitored ambient sound levels were not reliable; the latest switches =
rely on
infrared technology, ultrasonic signals, or both. Infrared switches are =
most
common in homes; they need a direct line of sight and work best in =
simple
four-walled spaces. Some, like Leviton's Decora Occupancy Sensor ($70), =
are
designed to replace a standard wall switch. Others are ceiling-mounted. =
Visit
sensorswitch.com or smarthome.com for more information.<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Salvaged Wood</span></b><br>
Salvaged wood comes from two places -- buildings that are being torn =
down or,
increasingly, underwater. Logging operations in the 19th century used =
waterways
to float trees to sawmills; many logs sank. Today, divers are recovering =
these
logs, which remain preserved in the cold fresh water. This salvaged wood =
often
sells at a premium -- $6 to $8 per board foot, and considerably more for =
exotic
varieties like bird's-eye maple. The logs are from virgin forests, where =
a
thick canopy slowed growth and resulted in exceptionally tight grains =
favored
by fine woodworkers. &quot;You can't buy that kind of wood new =
anymore,&quot;
says Wilson. Often the wood is from trees that are now largely wiped =
out, like
longleaf yellow pine. The wood can be used in any part of construction, =
from
ceiling beams to flooring, or in furniture. Lumber recovered from old =
buildings
is notable for its character, which may include nail holes or other =
markings.
Visit timelesstimber.com or thewoodenduck.com to learn more.<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>Compact Fluorescents</span></b><br>
These light bulbs, which use about 75 percent less energy than =
incandescent
bulbs, have been around since the early 1980s. But in the past few years
they've gotten better, smaller -- and cheaper. How cheap? Try five =
bucks, with
a five-year guarantee. The reason, says Wilson, is simple: competition.
&quot;When California had its power crisis there was a huge upsurge in =
compact
fluorescent, and Chinese companies began making them inexpensively. Now =
they're
being made by dozens of companies, plus some utilities offer =
rebates.&quot;
Today's compact fluorescents have electronic ballasts that switch on =
quickly
and don't buzz. And the colors are much warmer than the ghostly white =
models of
the past. (Wilson recommends compacts with a color temperature of 3,000 =
degrees
Kelvin.) Visit <a =
href=3D"file:///\\www.energystar.gov">www.energystar.gov</a> or
wattstopper.com to learn more.</p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>*****************************************
<br>
</span></font><b><font size=3D6 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:24.0pt;
font-family:Arial;font-weight:bold'>Talkin' Trash</span></font></b><br>
<font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>By </span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Nancy</span></font><font
size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'> Kalish<br>
The Reader Digest Association, Inc.</span></font> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>After
you toss a plastic soda bottle into a recycling bin, you probably don't =
think
much about what happens to it -- or the dozens of other items you throw =
away
each day. But believe it or not, your trash has a fascinating afterlife. =
Though
troublesome trends continue to develop, we do manage to recycle about a =
third
of our garbage, sometimes quite creatively. One reason: &quot;Trash is =
big business,&quot;
says Darryl Young, director of the California Department of =
Conservation.
Americans earn nearly $1 billion annually by recycling aluminum cans. =
&quot;And
lots of companies are working hard to design functional, often =
beautiful,
objects out of what we've tossed.&quot;<br>
<br>
Take a closer look at some of the reincarnations around you. In =
</span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Wharton</span></font><font
 size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'> </span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>State =
Park</span></font><font
size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'> in </span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>New =
Jersey</span></font><font
size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>, you'll
find the first vehicular bridge built largely from a strong-as-steel =
polymer
made of recycled plastics, including those soda bottles. Constructed in =
2002,
the bridge looks like it's made of painted wood. Lumber created from =
recycled
plastics is also being used in playgrounds, decks and outdoor furniture, =
such
as all-weather </span></font><font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:
 10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>Adirondack</span></font><font size=3D2 =
face=3DArial><span
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'> chairs carried by =
L.L.Bean.<br>
<br>
And that T-shirt you're wearing? It could also be made from recycled =
soda
bottles (it takes about 14 20-ounce bottles to make an extra large). The
plastic is chopped into small flakes, cleaned of contaminants, melted =
and
extruded into fibers, which are then spun to create yarn or other =
materials.<br>
<br>
Recycled plastic may also make up the fiberfill in your sleeping bag, =
using 85
bottles that might have lasted 700 years as landfill before =
degrading.<br>
<br>
Auto manufacturers have also gotten on the bandwagon. As a partner in =
the EPA's
WasteWise program, the Ford Motor Company uses recycled plastic soda =
bottles
(60 million of them in 1999) to make window frames, trunk carpets and =
other car
parts. And when its life is over, every Ford is at least 75 percent =
recyclable.
General Motors has also increased the amount of recycled materials it =
uses in
new cars.<br>
<br>
On the terrorism front, disposable razors and food storage containers =
are
recycled as security barriers made of Plas-Crete, a 50/50 mix of ground =
rigid
plastic and concrete. &quot;Plas-Crete is lighter than concrete, but =
just as
sturdy,&quot; says Paul Careau of Conigliaro Industries, the Framingham,
Massachusetts, maker of the material, which protects National Guard base
stations around the country. &quot;And when shot at by rifles, the =
barriers
were better at absorbing bullets without shattering.&quot;<br>
<br>
Of course, plastic isn't the only type of rubbish to be reborn. Despite =
e-mail
and other electronic documents, paper still comprises more than a third =
of all
trash. But almost half of all paper is recycled, reused as everything =
from
cereal cartons to soundproofing. Recycled tires spend their retirement
supporting national sports&#8212;literally. The stadiums and practice =
fields of
17 NFL teams feature FieldTurf, an artificial surface that's created =
from spent
tires -- 40,000 per field. It's low maintenance and easier on players' =
bodies.<br>
<br>
Even </span></font><font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;
  font-family:Arial'>New York City</span></font><font size=3D2 =
face=3DArial><span
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'> subway cars are finding =
life after
decommissioning -- as artificial reefs. More than 1,000 have been =
cleaned up
and dropped into waters off the coasts of New Jersey, Delaware, South =
Carolina,
Georgia and Virginia, where they serve as home (and importantly, =
nurseries) for
up to 200 species of sea life.<br>
<br>
While it's true the amount of household garbage in the =
</span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>United
  States</span></font><font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Arial'> has increased from 2.7 pounds per person per day in =
1960 to
4.4 pounds in 2001, recycling efforts are paying off. In 2001 we =
recycled 68
million tons (double the amount in 1990) of potential pollutants. And =
recycling
conserves energy -- one aluminum can saves enough energy to run a TV for =
three
hours.<br>
<br>
At the same time, manufacturing is priming the pump that makes garbage a
resource. &quot;Companies across all industries, from cars to carpets, =
have
spent hundreds of millions of dollars retrofitting their plants to use =
recycled
materials,&quot; says Terry Grist, a policy analyst for the EPA. Trash =
is cheap
raw material.<br>
<br>
On the downside, perhaps our biggest current problem is a recent =
phenomenon:
e-waste. Our rapidly upgrading technology is creating a lot of old, =
orphaned
electronics. According to Inform, Inc., an environmental research group, =
about
100 million cell phones were trashed in 2003 and less than 1 percent =
have been
recovered for reuse since 1999. The EPA predicts that 250 million =
computers
will become obsolete by 2005.<br>
<br>
&quot;The issue isn't just landfill space,&quot; says Eric Goldsmith of =
the
Goldsmith Group, an electronics recycling firm. &quot;Circuit boards =
contain
toxic heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium, that are extremely =
hazardous to
the environment. Fortunately, many manufacturers are designing more =
easily recycled
products -- or are making them with fewer hard-to-recover materials in =
the
first place -- before the federal government passes legislation to force =
them
to do it.&quot;<br>
<br>
For example, Panasonic is designing TVs and other products with fewer =
heavy
metals. Hewlett-Packard has created a prototype for an ink-jet printer =
with a
shell made from a compostable, corn-based &quot;bioplastic.&quot;<br>
<br>
And many computer companies are launching recycling programs, some of =
which
will arrange to pick up your equipment. &quot;The trouble is, most =
people
aren't aware of these programs,&quot; says Goldsmith. Manufacturer's =
websites,
however, list policies.<br>
<br>
Sometimes we unwittingly sabotage our own recycling efforts. &quot;While =
it's
true that the contents of plastic, glass and metal bins often get dumped =
together
and sorted again at the processing plant, it's key that all materials =
are of
recyclable quality,&quot; says Jennifer Gitlitz, research director of =
the
Container Recycling Institute. &quot;If you're overzealous and throw in =
a light
bulb or broken coffee mug or china plate -- none of which can be =
recycled --
you may be contaminating the whole batch.&quot; Check with your local =
public
works department for what is -- and isn't -- allowed.<br>
<br>
Apparently, Americans want to do the right thing. According to a 2003 =
survey, 91
percent of us are concerned about protecting the environment. And =
recently the
United Nations Environment Programme convened a panel of psychologists =
and
human behaviorists to find non-guilt-provoking approaches to market =
recycling.<br>
<br>
&quot;With so much other stuff to worry about, like terrorism, scary =
statistics
aren't making the same impact they used to,&quot; says Jacquelyn Ottman, =
a New
York City-based green marketing consultant. A new ad created for the =
state of </span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>California</span></font><fon=
t
size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'> features a
plastic bottle thrilled to be reborn as a lifesaving buoy carried by a
beautiful lifeguard; another has a glass bottle-turned-disco ball that =
gets to
party all night long. &quot;We want to show people there's hope and =
empower
them to make a difference as individuals -- because they can.&quot;<br>
<br>
<b><span style=3D'font-weight:bold'>It Is Easy Being =
Green</span></b></span></font><br>
<font size=3D2 face=3DArial><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'>In
addition to regular recycling, here are ways to make sure your waste =
isn't,
well, a total waste.<br>
<br>
l. Recycle old computer equipment (visit the manufacturer's website) or =
donate
it through an organization such as the National Cristina Foundation
(cristina.org), which matches equipment with schools and charities.<br>
<br>
2. Donate old cell phones to victims of domestic violence through the =
Wireless
Foundation's Call to Protect Campaign (wirelessfoundation.org).<br>
<br>
3. Drop off used cell phones, PDAs, pagers and other handheld devices at =
your
local Staples, which will donate them to charity or recycle.<br>
<br>
4. Recycle all rechargeable batteries from your electronics. You can =
call
800-8-BATTERY or visit rbrc.org to find one of 30,000 collection =
centers,
including many Home Depot, Staples and Sears stores.<br>
<br>
5. Nike's Reuse-A-Shoe program recycles old sneakers into Nike Grind, a =
surface
for basketball and tennis courts, soccer fields, tracks and playgrounds. =
For
drop-off locations, go to Nikebiz.com and click on =
&quot;responsibility&quot;
and then &quot;environment.&quot;<br>
<br>
6. Check out the furniture, toys, clothing and other products made from
recycled materials in the Green Gift Guide (greengiftguide.com), =
sponsored by
the California Department of Conservation.<br>
<br>
7. Don't forget the Salvation Army and similar charities. This =
organization
represents one of the best -- and most generous ways -- to recycle. =
</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'>*****************************************
<br>
</span></font><b><font size=3D6 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:24.0pt;
font-family:"Courier New";font-weight:bold'>FEMA'S NEW ON-LINE =
COURSES</span></font></b><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>
</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>UNDERSTANDING THE NEW NATIONAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM =
(NIMS)</span></font>
</p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>The Department of Homeland Security&#8217;s Federal =
Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA) has a new online course that will help first
responders understand the concepts and principles underlying the new =
National
Incident Management System (NIMS) and to begin incorporating NIMS into =
their
own planning and policies. To streamline coordination at the federal, =
state and
local levels, President Bush directed the creation of NIMS, a newly =
developed,
standardized incident management approach to emergency incidents. =
</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>&nbsp;</span></font> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>&#8220;NIMS
establishes standard incident management processes, protocols and =
procedures so
that all responders - including those at the federal, state, tribal and =
local
level - can coordinate their responses, share a common focus and place =
full
emphasis on resolving the event,&#8221; said Homeland Security Secretary =
Tom
Ridge. &#8220;This new course introduces NIMS in a way that is easy and
accessible to the nation&#8217;s emergency =
responders.&#8221;</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>&nbsp;</span></font> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>The
training experts at Homeland Security's Emergency Management Institute =
created
the online course, which takes about three hours to complete. The course =
can be
found at: </span></font><a =
href=3D"http://training.fema.gov/EMIWEB/IS/is700.asp"><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>http://training.fema.gov/EMIWEB/IS/is700.asp</span></font></a><font=

size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>.
</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>&nbsp;</span></font> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>The
recently announced </span></font><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier =
New"><span
  style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>NIMS</span></font><font
 size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>
 </span></font><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;
  font-family:"Courier New"'>Integration</span></font><font size=3D2
 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'> =
</span></font><font
  size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>Center</span></font><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>,
called the NIC, is being established to provide strategic direction and
oversight of NIMS. The NIC was established by Secretary Ridge with FEMA =
as the
lead to assure the all-hazards approach is an integral part of response
training. The NIC will develop and facilitate national standards for =
NIMS
education and training and refine the system over =
time.</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>&nbsp;</span></font> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>&#8220;Emergency
management is a departmental priority, and enhancing the capabilities of =
first
responders and emergency managers is key in responding to all =
hazards,&#8221;
said Michael D. Brown, Under Secretary of Homeland Security for =
Emergency
Preparedness and Response. &#8220;This new online course is one of many =
ways
Secretary Ridge and I are working with our partners to put NIMS into =
practice
for the American people.&#8221;</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>&nbsp;</span></font> <br>
<font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>NIMS
builds on the long-used and successful Incident Command System and the =
proven
principles of unified command. Another key feature of NIMS includes =
communication
and information management so that responders and managers across all =
agencies,
professions and jurisdictions have a common operating picture for a more
efficient and effective response.</span></font></p>

<p class=3DMsoNormal><font size=3D3 face=3D"Times New Roman"><span =
style=3D'font-size:
12.0pt'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>ENVIRONMENTAL AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION ISSUES DURING =
DISASTER
OPERATIONS</span></font> </p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>The Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA) is unveiling an on-line, independent study =
course that
will help local, state, tribal and federal officials to navigate =
environmental
and historic preservation compliance regulations that affect FEMA's =
disaster
recovery programs. </span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>&quot;This course is one of the largest and most complex =
that
we've ever put on our online Virtual Campus to date. It took some two =
years to
convert from our paper-based curriculum,&quot; said Michael D. Brown, =
Under
Secretary of Homeland Security for Emergency Preparedness and Response.
&quot;It shows how serious we are about expanding training opportunities
throughout the nation and far beyond our 'bricks and mortar' training =
facility
in </span></font><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;
  font-family:"Courier New"'>Maryland</span></font><font size=3D2
face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>.&quot;</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>Specialists at FEMA developed the online course, IS 253:
Coordinating Environmental and Historical Preservation Compliance. The =
online
course not only presents how compliance issues should be addressed but =
also
emphasizes that environmental/historical preservation issues should be
considered early in the recovery process in order for projects to be =
funded as
quickly as possible.<a =
href=3D"http://training.fema.gov/EMIWEB/IS/is253.asp">http://training.fem=
a.gov/EMIWEB/IS/is253.asp</a></span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>The course takes a minimum of 10 hours to complete, and =
those
who successfully complete it will receive a certificate. The course can =
be
accessed at </span></font><a =
href=3D"http://training.fema.gov/emiweb"><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier =
New"'>http://training.fema.gov/emiweb</span></font></a><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>.
>From there, interested students should click on NETC Virtual Campus to =
enroll.</span></font></p>

<p><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:
"Courier New"'>On </span></font><font size=3D2 face=3D"Courier =
New"><span
 style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>March 1, =
2003</span></font><font
size=3D2 face=3D"Courier New"><span =
style=3D'font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Courier New"'>,
FEMA became part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. FEMA's =
continuing
mission within the new department is to lead the effort to prepare the =
nation
for all hazards and effectively manage federal response and recovery =
efforts
following any national incident. FEMA also initiates proactive =
mitigation
activities, trains first responders, and manages Citizen Corps, the =
National
Flood Insurance Program and the U.S. Fire =
Administration.</span></font></p>

<p class=3DMsoNormal style=3D'margin-bottom:12.0pt'><font size=3D3
face=3D"Times New Roman"><span style=3D'font-size:12.0pt'><br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
</span></font></p>

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