[Pharmwaste] RE:Antibacterial soaps, Pharmwaste Digest, Vol 11, Issue 13

Andria Ventura aventura at cleanwater.org
Wed Sep 27 17:35:52 EDT 2006


Yes, it is common in many supermarkets and drug stores.  (Nor can you find
steel wool pads without the soap, which has questionable chemicals in it).
This is especially frustrating when we talk to folks living in low income
communities.  We talk about the issues around antibacterials, but often such
people don't have access to the specialty stores that feature alternatives
or at least plain soap products.  

-----Original Message-----
From: pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us
[mailto:pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us] On Behalf Of
pharmwaste-request at lists.dep.state.fl.us
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 8:52 AM
To: pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
Subject: Pharmwaste Digest, Vol 11, Issue 13

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Today's Topics:

   1. RE: Antibacterial Soaps (Tenace, Laurie)
   2. RE: Antibacterial Soaps (Volkman, Jennifer)
   3. 2007 Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products: State	of the
      Science Conference - Call for Abstracts (Marianna Vulli)
   4. NERC Guidance Documents (Tenace, Laurie)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2006 08:41:45 -0400
From: "Tenace, Laurie" <Laurie.Tenace at dep.state.fl.us>
Subject: RE: [Pharmwaste] Antibacterial Soaps
To: "Bill Lewry" <Bill_Lewry at kcmo.org>,
	<pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us>
Message-ID:
	<F3B05BF073E51740B024E311F9AAC73F01052F2F at tlhexsmb4.floridadep.net>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="US-ASCII"

Almost - I found only one without antibacterial additives at a Walmart 

Shop at a health food store for better options. 

Laurie


Laurie J. Tenace
Environmental Specialist
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 4555
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400
PH: (850) 245-8759
FAX: (850) 245-8811
Laurie.Tenace at dep.state.fl.us  
 
view our mercury web pages at: 
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/mercury/default.htm 

Please Note:  Florida has a very broad public records law.  Most written
communications to or from state officials regarding state business are
public
records available to the public and media upon request.  Your e-mail is
communications and may therefore be subject to public disclosure.


 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us
[mailto:pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us] On Behalf Of Bill Lewry
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2006 1:12 PM
To: pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
Subject: [Pharmwaste] Antibacterial Soaps

All:

Knowing the issues - and in my personal opinion deleterious effects of
these products without proven significant upsides - I was rather shocked
and dismayed to find that at our local large grocery store - it was NOT
POSSIBLE to purchase a hand soap without an antibacterial agent.

Any similar experiences?? - Kansas City - Missouri

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Pharmwaste mailing list
Pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
http://lists.dep.state.fl.us/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/pharmwaste


------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2006 09:26:50 -0500
From: "Volkman, Jennifer" <Jennifer.Volkman at state.mn.us>
Subject: RE: [Pharmwaste] Antibacterial Soaps
To: "Tenace, Laurie" <Laurie.Tenace at dep.state.fl.us>,	"Bill Lewry"
	<Bill_Lewry at kcmo.org>, <pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us>
Message-ID:
	<6246727221874A4FB8D3F9BBC37D9BD50110952B at s-sp22.pca.state.mn.us>
Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"

If you look through all the products at any given store, generally about 1
in 30 doesn't say antibacterial.  I can usually find one or two options, but
yah, that is about it.  I haven't investigated to see what the antibacterial
agent is or if it is the same in all products and then if it is also in the
ones that don't specifically state "antibacterial" on the label.

________________________________

From: pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us on behalf of Tenace, Laurie
Sent: Wed 9/20/2006 7:41 AM
To: Bill Lewry; pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
Subject: RE: [Pharmwaste] Antibacterial Soaps



Almost - I found only one without antibacterial additives at a Walmart

Shop at a health food store for better options.

Laurie


Laurie J. Tenace
Environmental Specialist
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
2600 Blair Stone Road, MS 4555
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400
PH: (850) 245-8759
FAX: (850) 245-8811
Laurie.Tenace at dep.state.fl.us 

view our mercury web pages at:
http://www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/mercury/default.htm

Please Note:  Florida has a very broad public records law.  Most written
communications to or from state officials regarding state business are
public
records available to the public and media upon request.  Your e-mail is
communications and may therefore be subject to public disclosure.





-----Original Message-----
From: pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us
[mailto:pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us] On Behalf Of Bill Lewry
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2006 1:12 PM
To: pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
Subject: [Pharmwaste] Antibacterial Soaps

All:

Knowing the issues - and in my personal opinion deleterious effects of
these products without proven significant upsides - I was rather shocked
and dismayed to find that at our local large grocery store - it was NOT
POSSIBLE to purchase a hand soap without an antibacterial agent.

Any similar experiences?? - Kansas City - Missouri

_______________________________________________
Pharmwaste mailing list
Pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
http://lists.dep.state.fl.us/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/pharmwaste
_______________________________________________
Pharmwaste mailing list
Pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
http://lists.dep.state.fl.us/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/pharmwaste




------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2006 14:26:09 -0400
From: "Marianna Vulli" <mvulli at neiwpcc.org>
Subject: [Pharmwaste] 2007 Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products:
	State	of the Science Conference - Call for Abstracts
To: <pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us>
Message-ID:
	<D85AC7B6452C8B41979CF91FE5DEB7C656A593 at neimail.NEIWPCC.local>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

NEIWPCC 

2007 Water Science Forum

 

Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products:

State of the Science

 

August 8 - 9, 2007

 

Portland, Maine

Holiday Inn by the Bay

 

Call for Abstracts 

 

The New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC)
is seeking presentations for the 2007 Northeast Water Science Forum -
Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products: State of the Science.  The
primary goal of this two-day conference is to bring together scientists,
regulators, water and wastewater professionals, and other technical
experts to disseminate and evaluate the latest research findings and
technical data on pharmaceuticals and personal care products in the
water environment. In addition, it will be a unique opportunity to
interface with experts working on this topic across the nation,
providing an opportunity to enhance technology transfer and increase
coordination among the entities interested in this issue. Please see the
attached document for more information and a list of potential
conference presentation topics.

 

Possible session topics include, but are not limited to the following
list of issues:

 

- identifying PPCPs of concern;

- occurrence of PPCPs (in Northeast) in surface water, groundwater and
coastal areas;

- PPCP impacts on aquatic ecosystems;

- PPCP impacts on human health;

- fate and removal of PPCPs in drinking water systems;

- fate and removal of PPCPs in wastewater systems (e.g., onsite systems,
sludges, biosolids);

- PPCP policy, regulatory, and legal issues;

- sampling and analytical methods;

- public education (e.g., risk communication, product labeling
programs); and

- product stewardship (e.g., take back programs, collection programs).

 

 

Abstracts are Due January 31, 2007

 

To submit your abstract, visit our website at
www.neiwpcc.org/ppcpconference .

 

Please contact Marianna Vulli (mvulli at neiwpcc.org) at NEIWPCC, (978)
323-7929 ext. 256 for more information. 

 

Since 1947, NEIWPCC has been a leader in the fight for clean water. As a
not-for-profit interstate agency, NEIWPCC serves and assists its member
states-Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode
Island, and Vermont-in many ways: by coordinating activities and forums
that encourage cooperation among the states, educating the public about
key water quality issues, supporting research projects, training
environmental professionals, and providing overall leadership in water
management and protection.

 

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Message: 4
Date: Wed, 27 Sep 2006 09:51:16 -0400
From: "Tenace, Laurie" <Laurie.Tenace at dep.state.fl.us>
Subject: [Pharmwaste] NERC Guidance Documents
To: <pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us>
Message-ID:
	<092ED29B94A857428BC3419763DE85DB04AB41 at tlhexsmb5.floridadep.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

These guidance documents are now available from NERC - Laurie

 

 

1. Managing Unwanted Medications - 2 Guidance Documents Now Available

Based on two years of research and eight pilot collections, NERC has
published the most comprehensive guidance for operating legal and safe
unwanted medication collections that is available.   

 

Two guidance documents have been published: one that is general and
addresses
any type of unwanted medication collection, and the other is specific to
collections held in conjunction with household hazardous waste events.

 

Operating Unwanted Medication Collections - A Legal & Safe Approach
[http://www.nerc.org/adobe/setting.up.draftFINAL.pdf], was researched and
written with funding from an EPA grant.  

 

Holding an Unwanted Medication Collection as Part of a Household Hazardous
Waste Event - A Legal & Safe Approach
[http://www.nerc.org/adobe/hhw.setting.upFINAL.pdf] was researched and
written with funding from a USDA-Rural Utilities Service grant. 

 

These documents carefully lay out the federal and state legal requirements
for operating an unwanted medication collection, as well as providing
in-depth information about planning and implementation such events.  Data
from the pilot collections is reported, including costs, hours to plan and
implement the collection events, and the amount of material that was
collected.

 

For more information, contact Lynn Rubinstein [lynn at nerc.org].

 

2. Cleaning Out Bulk Compounding Chemicals from Pharmacies - Guidance

Pharmacies may have stores of unwanted chemicals that were once used in the
on-site preparation of prescriptions.  Known as "bulk compounding
chemicals,"
these often include coal tar, phenol, and sulfur power. Most pharmacies
rarely, if ever, do on-site compounding of pharmaceuticals anymore.

 

Bulk compounding chemicals are chemicals - not drugs.  Once determined to be
a waste rather than an inventory item, many of these are Resource
Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous wastes.  Due to a lack of
familiarity with how to dispose of these chemicals, as well as the
difficulty
and expense of disposing of small amounts of wastes (i.e., one or two
gallons) on a one-time basis, pharmacies may store unwanted bulk compounding
chemicals in a cabinet for many years, uncertain of what else to do.  

 

Providing the opportunity to appropriately remove and manage these materials
is a valuable service that household hazardous waste programs can offer to
businesses in their community. The goal is to divert bulk compounding
chemicals from the municipal solid waste stream by establishing a cost
effective and convenient system for disposal as a hazardous waste. The
strategy is to create partnerships between existing household hazardous
waste
programs that accept materials from conditionally exempt generators of
hazardous waste.

 

Cleaning Out Bulk Compounding Chemicals from Pharmacies: Developing
Partnerships with Household Hazardous Waste Programs
[http://www.nerc.org/adobe/collecting_bulk_compounding_chemicalsFINAL.pdf],
is a new guidance document that details how to develop successful
partnerships between household hazardous waste collection programs and
pharmacies.  The guidance is the result of a pilot project that NERC
conducted, with funding from the EPA.  The project identified pharmacies
with
unwanted bulk compounding chemicals and demonstrated that their
participation
in local household hazardous waste collections is a cost-effective and
convenient method of disposing of these materials responsibility.  This
document does not address the disposal of unwanted medications.  

 

For more information, contact Lynn Rubinstein [lynn at nerc.org].

 

 

 

Lynn Rubinstein, Executive Director
Northeast Recycling Council, Inc.
139 Main St., Suite 401
Brattleboro, VT  05301
lynn at nerc.org    www.nerc.org
802-254-3636/802-254-5870 fax

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