FW: [Pharmwaste] WRF Study: Trace Pharms in Drinking Water Too Lowto Impact Human Health

Tenace, Laurie Laurie.Tenace at dep.state.fl.us
Mon Mar 16 08:02:53 EDT 2009


Comments from a non-member:

 

From: Edo McGowan [mailto: edo_mcgowan at hotmail.com] 
Sent: Sunday, March 15, 2009 1:27 AM
To: pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us
Subject: RE: [Pharmwaste] WRF Study: Trace Pharms in Drinking Water Too Lowto
Impact Human Health

 

I would raise the same question I did at the Research Triangle Environmental
Health Collaborative (RTEHC) of November 10-11, 2008 on pharmaceuticals in
water. That question was never answered---it was----what impacts accrue to
interactions with biofilms and pharmaceuticals in water? How does that impact
the levels of multi-drug resistance within sgedding biofilms? When we also
throw in antibiotic resistant genes which are not affected by current levels
of chlorine found in potable water supplies as well as the fact that these
genes are not stopped by typical filtering systems used by potable water
treatment, we have several unanswered questions. These are the questions that
needs to be addressed. One of the other scientists at the RTECH also kept
raising the question on fetal impacts and that question also was consistently
ignored. Thus, I think that there are a lot of serious unanswered questions
that are inconvenient for the industry to address.

Dr Edo McGowan






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From: Pete Pasterz <PAPasterz at cabarruscounty.us>
To: pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us <pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us>
Sent: Fri, 13 Mar 2009 4:52 pm
Subject: RE: [Pharmwaste] WRF Study: Trace Pharms in Drinking Water Too Low
to Impact Human Health

Boy, what a relief!  I'm glad that they used the EPA's methods for
determining 

Acceptable Daily Intake, because history has shown that this provides the 

foolproof certainty needed to assure us that everything is OK with exposures
of 

every individual compound to adult male humans --even if the chemicals aren't
actually tested in and of themselves and in combination with one another.



 Pete Pasterz, NCQRPþ

Cabarrus County Recycling and HHW

PO BOX 707 

Concord, NC  28026

704-920-3280

www.cabarruscounty.us/waste

If you're not for ZERO Waste, how much Waste ARE you for?





-----Original Message-----

From: pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us
[mailto:pharmwaste-bounces at lists.dep.state.fl.us
<mailto:pharmwaste-bounces at lists%20%20..dep.state.fl.us?> ] 

On Behalf Of Bowling, Patrick

Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 4:40 PM

To: pharmwaste at lists.dep.state.fl.us

Subject: [Pharmwaste] WRF Study: Trace Pharms in Drinking Water Too Low to 

Impact Human Health



(from: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2009/03/prweb2199124.htm)



Levels of Trace Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water Too Low to Impact Human
Health 

According to Water Research Foundation Study



The concentrations of pharmaceutical drugs and endocrine-disrupting compounds
found in our public drinking water are likely too low to impact human health,
according to a new report by the Water Research Foundation, the nation's
leading 

drinking water research organization.



Denver, CO (PRWEB) March 4, 2009 -- The concentrations of pharmaceutical
drugs 

and endocrine-disrupting compounds found in our public drinking water are
likely 

too low to impact human health, according to a new report by the Water
Research 

Foundation, the nation's leading drinking water research organization.



The Water Research Foundation presented its findings at a February 27 

congressional briefing.



Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) encompass a variety of chemical
classes, 

including hormones, plant constituents (phytoestrogens), pesticides,
compounds 

used in the plastics industry and in consumer products, and other industrial 

by-products. There is20growing public attention and concern about the
possibility 

of health effects from trace amounts of EDCs and drugs that are flushed down
the 

toilet or enter the water supply through human and livestock waste. The Water
Research Foundation report examined not only the presence of trace levels of 

EDCs and drugs in water, but explored if there is a potential link between
the 

levels of these compounds found in water and effects on human health.



Water Research Foundation has committed up to $1 million per year to an 

integrated, multi-year research program to address specific issues associated
with ultra-low levels of drugs and chemicals in the water supply.



The report, titled Toxicological Relevance of Endocrine Disruptors and 

Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water, concludes three years of research in 

collaboration with 17 water utilities.



"Even the most advanced treatment processes that we've studied won't achieve
an 

absolute zero level of contaminants," said study researcher Shane Snyder,
Ph.D., 

research and development project manager for Southern Nevada Water Authority.
"Therefore, it's vital that we look at the real risks before we spend a 

tremendous amount of resources on the issue."



The study's objective was to inform water utilities, regulators, scientists,
and 

the public about the occurrence and potential human health relevance of 

pharmaceuticals and EDCs in drinking water.



Research Methods and Selected Findings:



The Water Research Fo

undation research team first selected 62 representative 

chemicals for further evaluation. The selection criteria included likelihood
of 

occurrence, production volume, toxicity, and analytical capability. The 

scientists drew 300 water samples from 19 sites nationwide and analyzed them
for 

the selected suite of compounds using extremely sensitive analytical methods 

with low part-per-trillion detection limits. The team conducted risk
evaluations 

assuming exposure through drinking water for all target pharmaceuticals, 10
of 

the suspected EDCs, and three of the hormones. Acceptable daily intakes
(ADIs) 

were calculated using methods consistent with Environmental Protection Agency
approaches for determining levels of exposure to environmental contaminants
that 

are not likely to be associated with adverse health effects. To estimate the 

exposure of these compounds via drinking water, the ADIs were then converted
to 

drinking water equivalent levels.



Key conclusions reported include the following:



* Of the 62 compounds analyzed, only three were consistently (>50 percent 

frequency) found in the water samples



* Trace concentrations of 24 compounds were detectable in at least 20 percent
of 

raw (untreated) water samples



* Trace concentrations of 11 compounds were found in at least 20 percent of 

finished (treated) drinking water samples. Five prescription drug-related 

compounds were detected: atenolol, Dilantin, carbamazepine, gemfibrozil, and 

sulfamethoxazole. The scientists also fou

nd trace amounts of atrazine (a widely 

used herbicide), DEET (an active ingredient of insect repellants),
metolachlor 

(a pesticide), and two flame retardants used in consumer products, Tris 

(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TECP) and Tris (chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP).



* The target compound detected at the highest concentration was atrazine. 

Atrazine was detected at levels as high as 870 parts per trillion or
nanograms 

per liter (ng/l), less than a third of the federal regulatory limit of 3,000 

parts per trillion or ng/l. The median level of atrazine detected in the
study 

was 49 ng/l.



"Pharmaceuticals and EDCs can certainly be detected in water, and science
will 

continue to establish lower and lower detection limits," said Snyder. "Based
on 

the research done so far, they appear to occur at levels far below acceptable
daily intake levels."



"Concerns may be raised because detection of chemicals seems to be evidence 

enough of risk," Snyder added. "But in the world of toxicology, it's the
dose, 

or amount of a substance, that can create a health risk. It's the
concentration 

that matters."





About the Water Research Foundation:

Founded in 1966, the Water Research Foundation is an international, 501c(3) 

nonprofit organization that sponsors research to enable water utilities,
public 

health agencies and other professionals to provide safe and affordable
drinking 

water to the public. With more than 950 subscriber members who provide water
for 0D

80 percent of the U.S. population, the Water Research Foundation has funded
and 

managed more than 1,000 projects. For more information, go to 

www.WaterResearchFoundation.org <http://www.waterresearchfoundation.org/> .



Contact:

Jill Estabrook Wisehart

Communications Director

303.347.6111



# # #



=========================



G. Patrick Bowling, P.G. | Senior Geologist

PA Department of Environmental Protection

Rachel Carson State Office Building

400 Market Street | P.O. Box 8555

Harrisburg, PA 17105-8555

Phone: 717-772-4048 | Fax: 717-787-9549

Email: gbowling at state.pa.us  www.depweb.state.pa.us
<http://www.depweb.state.pa.us/> 

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